A Guide to DEA Registration

According to a Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) report since 2000 more than 30,000 Americans have lost their lives from an opioid overdose. Titles II and III of the Controlled Substances Act of 1970 (CSA), requires all registrants to register for DEA new...

A complete guide to DEA form 222

The DEA Drug Enforcement Administration functions strictly all over the United States with support from federal governments to prevent controlled substance diversion and ensure that prescribed drugs used, are solely administered in treating patients. According to the...

Trust but verify

Don’t risk your DEA license. The three keys to preventing employee theft of controlled drugs are evaluate, investigate and reiterate.

Let’s start with a simple fact: Employees can and will steal from your drug inventory if given the opportunity. A Drug Diversion Digest report tracking the diversion of controlled substances over a six-month period found that 71% of incidents involved an employee. Sadly, this often includes people you consider “family.”

The privilege of a DEA registration – Two sides of the coin

As our investigative experts work with veterinary practices across the country, one regulatory compliance issue that we see causing confusion over and over again is both one of the most basic and yet seems to cause the most confusion – the DEA registration. Getting a registration and maintaining it can take just a few simple steps, but seems to be at the core of many veterinary practitioner’s questions and concerns.

As our investigative experts work with veterinary practices across the country, one regulatory compliance issue that we see causing confusion over and over again is both one of the most basic and yet seems to cause the most confusion – the DEA registration. Getting a registration and maintaining it can take just a few simple steps, but seems to be at the core of many veterinary practitioner’s questions and concerns.